Past Issues

Full Archive of Past Issues

  • Click here for access to NLH issues from 1995 to the present
  • Click here for access to NLH issues from 1969-1994

 
Recent Past Issues

45, 1 (2014)

Winter 2014

Ecology, Agency, Entanglement

  • Bruno Latour, “Agency at the Time of the Anthropocene”
  • Ian Hodder, “The Entanglements of Humans and Things: A Long-Term View”
  • Graham Harman, “Entanglement and Relation: A Response to Bruno Latour and Ian Hodder”
     
  • Dora Zhang, “Naming the Indescribable: Woolf, Russell, James, and the Limits of the Description”
  • Günter Leypoldt, “Singularity and the Literary Market”
  • Hanna Meretoja, “Narrative and Human Existence: Ontology, Epistemology, and Ethics”
  • Joshua Gass, “Moll Flanders and the Bastard Birth of Realist Character”
  • Ben Parker, “Recognition or Reification?: Capitalist Crisis and Subjectivity in Little Dorrit
     

44, 4 (2013)

Use

  • Rita Felski, Introduction
  • Michael S. Roth, “Pragmatic Liberal Education”
  • Helen Small, “Fully Accountable”
  • Terry Eagleton, “Bodies, Artworks, and Use Values”
  • Brian Boyd, “Arts, Humanities, Sciences, Uses”
  • Elizabeth Fowler, “Art and Orientation”
  • R. M. Berry, “Wittgenstein’s Use”
  • Jim Collins, “The Use Values of Narrativity in Digital Cultures”
  • Nancy Easterlin, “The Functions of Literature and the Evolution of Extended Mind”

 

44, 3 (2013)

Summer 2013

Styles of Criticism

  • Michael Chaouli, “Criticism and Style”
  • Andrew H. Miller, “Implicative Criticism, or The Display of Thinking”
  • Timothy Yu, “Wittgenstein, Pedagogy, and Literary Criticism”
     
  • Pascale Casanova, “What is Dominant Language? Giacomo Leopardi: Theoretician of Linguistic Inequality”
  • Jerome McGann, “American Memory in Black Elk Speaks
  • J. E. Elliott, “The Social Structure of English in the Text of Theory”
  • Thomas H. Ford, “Poetry’s Media”
  • Cynthia Turner Camp, “Spatial Memory, Historiographic Fantasy, and the Touch of the Past in St. Erkenwald
  • Jesper Gulddal, “Narratives of Resentment: Notes towards a Literary History of European Anti-Americanism”
     

44, 2 (2013)

The French Issue: New Perspectives on Reading from France

  • Philippe Roger, “Introduction: Five French Critics”
  • Marielle Macé, “Ways of Reading, Modes of Being”
  • Pierre Bayard, “Anticipatory Plagiarism”
  • François Cusset, “Unthinkable Readers: The Political Blindspot of French Literature”
  • Jean-Marie Schaeffer, “Literary Studies and Literary Experience”
  • Yves Citton, “Reading Literature and the Political Ecology of Gestures in the Age of Semiocapitalism”
  • Toril Moi, “Afterword: How the French Read”
     

44, 1 (2013)

Winter 2013

Recognition

  • Nikolas Kompridis, “Recognition and Receptivity: Forms of Normative Response in the Lives of the Animals We Are
  • James Simpson, “Cognition is Recognition: Literary Knowledge and Textual ‘Face’”
  • Winfried Fluck, “Reading for Recognition”
  • Aleida Assmann, “Civilizing Societies:Recognition and Respect in a Global World”
     
  • Jeffrey Knapp, “Mass Entertainment Before Mass Entertainment”
  • Patrick Fessenbecker, “In Defense of Paraphrase”
  • Joseph North, “What’s ‘New Critical’ about ‘Close Reading’? I. A. Richards and His New Critical Reception”
  • Kuei-fen Chiu, “Cosmopolitanism and Indigenism: The Uses of Cultural Authenticity in an Age of Flows”
  • James Lee, “Ethopoiesis: Foucault’s Late Ethics and the Sublime Body”
     

43, 4 (2012)

A New Europe?

  • Rita Felski, “Introduction”
  • Karl Heinz Bohrer,  “‘Europe’ as Utopia: Causes of Its Decline”
  • Ann Rigney, “Transforming Memory and the European Project”
  • Chantal Mouffe, “An Agonistic Approach to the Future of Europe”
  • Ulrich Beck, “The European Crisis in the Context of Cosmopolitization”
  • Nilüfer Göle, “Decentering Europe, Recentering Islam”
  • Michel Wieviorka, “A Critique of Europe”
  • Thomas Elsaesser, “European Cinema and the Postheroic Narrative: Jean-Luc Nancy, Claire Denis and Beau Travail
  • Anca Parvulescu, “Old Europe, New Europe, Eastern Europe:  Reflections on a Minor Character in Fassbinder’s Ali, Fear Eats the Soul
     

43, 3 (2012)

In the Mood

  • Rita Felski and Susan Fraiman, “Introduction”
  • René Rosfort and Giovanni Stanghellini, “In the Mood for Thought: Feeling and Thinking in Philosophy”
  • Lars Svendsen, “Moods and the Meaning of Philosophy”
  • Richard Shusterman, “Thought in the Strenuous Mood: Pragmatism as a Philosophy of Feeling”
  • Carl Plantinga, “Art Moods and Human Moods in Narrative Cinema”
  • John Rhym, “Towards a Phenomenology of Cinematic Mood: Boredom and the Affect of Time in Antonioni’s L’eclisse
  • Jonathan Flatley, “How A Revolutionary Counter-Mood Is Made”
  • Clare Hemmings, “In The Mood For Revolution: Emma Goldman’s Passion”
  • Ellis Hanson, “The Languorous Critic”
  • Jane Gallop, “Precocious Jouissance: Roland Barthes, Amatory Maladjustment, and Emotion”
     

43, 2 (2012)

Spring 2012

Object-Oriented Literary Criticism

  • Graham Harman, “The Well Wrought Broken Hammer: Object Oriented Literary Criticism”
  • Timothy Morton, “An Object-Oriented Defense of Poetry”
  • Jane Bennett, “Systems and Things: A Response to Graham Harman and Timothy Morton”
     
  • Nicholas Hengen Fox, “A Habermasian Literary Criticism”
  • Diego Rossello, “Hobbes and the Wolf-Man: Melancholy and Animality in Modern Sovereignty”
  • Sara Landreth, “Breaking the Laws of Motion: Pneumatology and Belles Lettres in Eighteenth-Century Britain”
     

The State of Postcolonial Studies Continued

  • Bill Bell, “Signs Taken for Wonders: An Anecdote Taken from History”
     

Responses to Dipesh Chakrabarty and Robert JC Young

  • Simon During, “Empire’s Present”
  • Benita Parry, “What is Left in Postcolonial Studies?”
  • Ato Quayson, “The Sighs of History: Postcolonial Debris and the Question of (Literary) History”
  • Robert Stam and Ella Shohat, “Whence and Whither Postcolonial Theory?”


43, 1 (2012)

Winter 2012

The State of Postcolonial Studies

  • Dipesh Chakrabarty, “Postcolonial Studies and the Challenge of Climate Change”
  • Robert JC Young, “Postcolonial Remains”
     
  • Henry Staten, “The Origin of the Work of Art in Material Practice”
  • Charles Altieri, “What Theory can Learn from New Directions in Contemporary American Poetry”
  • Shoshana Benjamin, “On the Distinctiveness of Poetic Language”
  • Rachel Sagner Buurma and Laura Heffernan, “The Common Reader and the Archival Classroom: Disciplinary History for the Twenty-First Century”
  • Sinéad Garrigan Mattar, “Yeats, Fairies, and the New Animism”
  • Hannah Freed-Thall, “‘Prestige of a Momentary Diamond’: Economies of Distinction in Proust”

 
42, 4 (2011)

Context?

Edited by Rita Felski and Herbert F. Tucker

  • Herbert F. Tucker, “Introduction”
  • Martin Jay, “Historical Explanation and the Event: Reflections on the Limits of
    Contextualization”
  • Rita Felski, “‘Context Stinks!’”
  • Bruce Holsinger, “‘Historical Context’ in Historical Context: Surface, Depth, and the Making of the Text”
  • Jonathan Gil Harris, “Four Exoskeletons and No Funeral”
  • Michael Bristol, “Macbeth the Philosopher: Rethinking Context”
  • Michael Levenson, “Novelty, Modernity, Adjacency”
  • Derek Attridge, “Context, Idioculture, Invention”
  • Claire Colebrook, “The Context of Humanism”
  • David Greetham, “Context and the ‘Impossibility’ Trope”
  • Eric Hayot, “Against Periodization; or, On Institutional Time”

 
42, 3 (2011)

Summer 2011

The State of American Studies

  • Winfried Fluck, “A New Beginning? Transnationalisms”
  • Robyn Wiegman, “The Ends of New Americanism”
  • John Michael, “Transnational American Studies or, Tainted Love”
  • Ingo Berensmeyer, “Cultural Ecology and Chinese Hamlets
  • Tzachi Zamir, “Talking Trees”
  • Kendall Walton, “Thoughtwriting—in Poetry and Music”
  • Zachary Sayre Schiffman, “Historicizing History/Contextualizing Context”
  • Sean Gaston, “Derrida and the End of the World”
  • Bernadette Guthrie, “Invoking Derrida: Authorship, Readership, and the Specter of Presence in Film and Print”
  • Dries Vrijders “History, Poetry, and the Footnote: Cleanth Brooks and Kenneth Burke on Keats’s ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’”

 
42, 2 (2011)

Character

Edited by Rita Felski

  • Rita Felski, “Introduction”
  • Amanda Anderson, “Character and Ideology: The Case of Cold War Liberalism”
  • Sara Ahmed, “Willful Parts: Problem Characters or the Problem of Character”
  • Julian Murphet, “The Mole and the Multiple: A Chiasmus of Character”
  • Murray Smith, “On the Twofoldness of Character”
  • Suzanne Keen, “Readers’ Temperaments and Fictional Character”
  • Catherine Gallagher, “What Would Napoleon Do? Historical, Fictional, and Counterfactual Characters”
  • Paisley Livingstone and Andrea Sauchelli, “Philosophical Perspectives on Fictional Characters”

 
42, 1 (2011)

Winter 2011

  • Alan Liu, “Friending the Past: The Sense of History and Social Computing”
  • Peter Uwe Hohendahl, “A Precarious Balance: Adorno and German Classicism”

Doing Without Art

  • Steven Connor, “Doing Without Art”
  • Ellen Dissanayake, “Doing Without the Ideology of Art”
  • Charles Altieri, “Where Can Aesthetics Go?”

Cluster on Reading

  • Paul B. Armstrong, “In Defense of Reading: Or, Why Reading Still Matters in a Contextualist Age”
  • Peter Schwenger, “The Obbligato Effect”
  • John Lurz, “Sleeping with Proust: Reading, Sensation and the Books of the Recherche
     
  • Hsuan L. Hsu, “Fatal Contiguities:  Metonymy and Environmental Justice”
  • Elizabeth Susan Anker, “Elizabeth Costello, Embodiment, and the Limits of Rights”
  • Nicholas Robinette, “The World Laid Waste:  Herder, Language-Labor, Empire”

 
41, 4 (2010)

What Is an Avant-Garde?

  • Jonathan P. Eburne and Rita Felski, “Introduction”
  • Peter Bürger, “Avant-Garde and Neo-Avant-Garde: An Attempt to Answer Certain Critics of Theory of the Avant-garde
  • John Roberts, “Revolutionary Pathos, Negation, and the Suspensive Avant-Garde”
  • Elizabeth Harney, “Postcolonial Agitations: Avant-Gardism in Dakar and London”
  • Mike Sell, “Resisting the Question, ‘What Is an Avant-Garde?’”
  • Benjamin Lee, “Avant-Garde Poetry as Subcultural Practice: Mailer and Di Prima’s Hipsters”
  • Griselda Pollock, “Moments and Temporalities of the Avant-Garde ‘in, of, and from the feminine’”
  • Amy J. Elias, “Psychogeography, Détournement, Cyberspace”
  • Philippe Sers, “The Radical Avant-Garde and the Contemporary Avant-Garde”
  • Walter L. Adamson, “How Avant-Gardes End—and Begin: Italian Futurism in Historical Perspective”
  • Bob Perelman, “My Avant-Garde Card”
  • Richard Schechner, “The Conservative Avant-Garde”
  • Martin Puchner, “It’s Not Over (’Til It’s Over)”

 
41, 3 (2010)

Summer 2010

Edited by Rita Felski

  • Bruno Latour, “An Attempt at a ‘Compositionist Manifesto’”
  • Ian Hunter, “Scenes from the History of Poststructuralism: Davos, Freiburg, Baltimore, Leipzig”
  • Robert Pippin, “Philosophical Film: Trapped by Oneself in Jacques Tourneur’s Out of the Past
  • Krishan Kumar, “The Ends of Utopia”
  • Shira Wolosky, “Relational Aesthetics and Feminist Poetics”
  • Rupert Read, “Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations as a War Book”
  • James Phillips, “Wordsworth and the Fraternity of Joy”
  • Nergis Erturk, “Those Outside the Scene: Snow in the World Republic of Letters”
  • Angus Fletcher and Michael Benveniste, “Defending Pluralism: The Chicago School and the Case of Tom Jones
  • Patrick Redding, “Whitman Unbound: Democracy and Poetic Form, 1912-1931”

 
41, 2 (2010)

New Sociologies of Literature

Edited by James English and Rita Felski

  • James F. English, “Everywhere and Nowhere: The Sociology of Literature After ‘the Sociology of Literature’”
  • John Frow, “On Midlevel Concepts”
  • Tony Bennett, “Sociology, Aesthetics, Expertise”
  • Timothy Brennan, “Running and Dodging: The Rhetoric of Doubleness in Contemporary Theory”
  • David J. Alworth, “Supermarket Sociology”
  • Mark McGurl, “Ordinary Doom: Literary Studies in the Waste Land of the Present”
  • Shai M. Dromi and Eva Illouz, “Recovering Morality: Pragmatic Sociology and Literary Studies”
  • Heather Love, “Close but not Deep: Literary Ethics and the Descriptive Turn”
  • Elaine Freedgood, “Fictional Settlements: Footnotes, Metalepsis, the Colonial Effect”
  • Ato Quayson, “Kòbòlò Poetics: Urban Transcripts and their Reading Publics in Africa”
  • Michèle Richman, “Bernard Lahire and ‘The Double Life of Writers’”
  • Bernard Lahire, “The Double Life of Writers”
 

41, 1 (2010)

Winter 2010

Edited by Rita Felski

  • Rita Felski, Editorial Statement
  • Bonnie Honig, “Antigone’s Two Laws: Greek Tragedy and the Politics of Humanism”
  • Karl Heinz Bohrer “The Tragic: A Question of Art, not Philosophy of History”
  • Joseph Carroll, “Three Scenarios for Literary Darwinism”
  • Richard Shusterman, “Pragmatism and Cultural Politics: From Rortian Textualism to Somaesthetics”
  • Kristin Ross, “Parisian Noir”
  • Evan Horowitz, “London: Capital of the Nineteenth Century”
  • Tzachi Zamir, “The Theatricalization of Love”
  • Christopher Peterson, “The Aping Apes of Poe and Wright: Race, Animality, and Mimicry in ‘The Murders in the Rue Morgue’ and Native Son
  • T. Austin Graham, “The Slaveries of Sex, Race, and Mind: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Lady Byron Vindicated
  • Elizabeth Freudenthal, “Anti-Interiority: Compulsivness, Objectification, and Identity in Infinite Jest
  • Teckyoung Kwon, “The Materiality of Remembering: Freud’s Wolf Man and the Biological Dimensions of Memory

 

40, 4 (2009)

Tribute to Ralph Cohen

Edited by Rita Felski and Herbert F. Tucker

  • Rita Felski and Herbert F. Tucker, Introduction
  • John T. Casteen III, Ralph Cohen and New Literary History
  • Jeffrey L. Williams, The Rise of the Theory Journal
  • Jonathan Arac, Reckoning with New Literary History
  • David Bleich, New Academic History
  • Clifford Siskin, Re-mediating Ralph
  • Gordon Hutner, The Lessons of the Editor
  • Wang Ning, Ralph Cohen, New Literary History, and Literary Studies in China
  • Hélène Cixous, Tribute to Ralph Cohen
  • Alastair Fowler, The Title Justified
  • Martha Nussbaum, Ralph Cohen and the Dialogue between Philosophy and Literature
  • Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, New Literary History: Pages from a Memoir
  • Brian Stock, Reflections on Ancient Narrative and Ethics
  • Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, From a Close Distance: Ralph Cohen’s Presence
  • Mary Poovey, Memories of Ralph Cohen, Generic and Otherwise
  • Toril Moi, “They practice their trades in different worlds”: Concepts in Poststructuralism and Ordinary Language Philosophy
  • Jerome McGann, Literary History and Editorial Method: Poe and Antebellum America
  • Gary Saul Morson, Return to Process: The Unfolding of The Idiot
  • Hayden White, Reflections on “Gendre” in the Discourses of History
  • Jonathan Culler, Lyric, History, and Genre
  • Frances Ferguson, Ralph Cohen: Analyst of the Literary Field
  • John L. Rowlett, A Guide to Receiving Ralph Cohen
  • Jeffrey L. Williams, History and Change: An Interview with Ralph Cohen

 

40, 3 (2009)

Comparison

  • Rita Felski and Susan Stanford Friedman, Introduction
  • R. Radhakrishnan, Why Compare?
  • Robert Stam and Ella Shohat, Transnationalizing Comparison: The Uses and Abuses of Cross-
    Cultural Analogy
  • Ania Loomba, Race and the Possibilities of Comparative Critique
  • Pheng Cheah, The Material World of Comparison
  • Bruce Robbins, Chomsky’s Golden Rule: Comparison and Cosmopolitanism
  • Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Comparison Literature
  • Mary N. Layoun, Endings and Beginnings: Reimagining the Tasks and Spaces of Comparison
  • Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Rethinking Comparativism
  • Richard Handler, The Uses of Incommensurability in Anthropology
  • Caroline B. Brettell, Anthropology, Migration, and Comparative Consciousness

 

40, 2 (2009)

India and the West

Edited by Ralph Cohen and R. S. Khare

  • R. S. Khare, Changing India-West Cultural Dialectics
  • Jonardon Ganeri, Intellectual India: Reason, Identity, Dissent
  • Sanjay Krishnan, The Place of India in Postcolonial Studies: Chatterjee, Chakrabarty, Spivak
  • Vinay Lal, Gandhi’s West, the West’s Gandhi
  • Sudesh Mishra, News from the Crypt: India, Modernity, and the West
  • Arun P. Mukherjee, B. R. Ambedkar, John Dewey, and the Meaning of Democracy
  • Vyjayanthi Rao, Embracing Urbanism: The City as Archive
  • Vijay Mishra, Rushdie-Wushdie: Salman Rushdie’s Hobson-Jobson
  • Faisal Devji, The Mutiny to Come
  • Martha Nussbaum, Commentary